9 EXTRAORDINARY BRITISH LANDSCAPES

With 15 National Parks, the UK has no shortage of spectacular geography. Here are 9 of our most incredible natural landscapes

Illustration photo of 9 EXTRAORDINARY BRITISH LANDSCAPES

THE GLYDERAU, SNOWDONIA



The cluster of peaks south of Llyn Ogwen includes some of the finest mountains in Wales, with fantastically spiky outcrops on Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach, but none are more striking and distinctive than the scaled dragon back of Tryfan (pictured).
Picture: Visit Wales

GIANT’S CAUSEWAY, COUNTY ANTRIM



The Giant’s Causeway is a spectacular, volcanically-formed mosaic, composed of thousands of basalt columns. It is currently Northern Ireland’s sole World Heritage Site.
Image: Discover Northern Ireland

ASSYNT, NORTH-WEST HIGHLANDS



Assynt is an incredible outdoor playground, boasting some of Scotland’s most distinctive mountains, including Stac Pollaidh, Ben Mor Assynt and the remarkable Suilven. And as if all those remarkable mountains weren’t enough, Assynt is also home to Eas a' Chual Aluinn, Britain’s highest waterfall.
Image: Dougie Cunningham

JURASSIC COAST, DORSET AND EAST DEVON



The Jurassic Coast showcases 185 million years of geological history and landmarks including the elegant aqua oval of Lulworth Cove (pictured) and the oft-photographed arch of Durdle Door. The South West Coast Path offers fantastic walking along the coastal landscape.
Image: Jurassic Coast Team

LIMESTONE PAVEMENT, YORKSHIRE DALES



These intricate landforms are forged from glacial scrapes, which leave a flat surface, followed by erosion in the cracks, which form the distinctive ‘slabs’. The Yorkshire Dales has the UK’s finest limestone pavements, including a large area above Malham Cove (pictured).
Image: Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority

FINGAL’S CAVE, ISLE OF STAFFA



Basalt columns teeth the yawning entrance of Fingal’s Cave and its deep, echoing chamber. You can walk from elsewhere on the island to the cave and explore above the water level. It is thought that the legend of an Irish giant building a causeway between Ireland and Scotland may be inspired by the fact that the cave is geologically similar to the basalt columns of County Antrim.
Image: National Trust for Scotland

CHEDDAR GORGE, SOMERSET



Cheddar Gorge’s steep, limestone cliffs plummet to an impressive maximum depth of 137m/449ft along the three-mile route of the gorge. A network of caves runs underneath, some of which are open to the public.
Image: cheddargorge.co.uk

OLD MAN OF HOY, ORKNEY

At 137m/449ft (equal to the depth of Cheddar Gorge!) the Old Man of Hoy is one of the UK’s tallest sea stacks and is legendary among rock climbers. This red sandstone giant was first climbed by Chris Bonington in 1966, and in 2014 he returned to climb it again... aged 80!

Image: Berghaus

WATCH THE VIDEO OF HIS SECOND CLIMB HERE

HIGH FORCE, DURHAM



Although known as England’s largest waterfall, High Force is not the tallest – but with a drop of 21m/70ft, it is high, wide and dramatic. The full might of the River Tees thunders over a hardy sheet of whinstone above softer layers of sandstone and limestone, plunging into a bubbling pool below.
Image: North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Partnership